Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

Sanctuary Nomination Process

SRV | Class III | Class II | Specialty Vessels | Contact Us

These vessels are fundamental tools that allow sanctuaries to accomplish its mission objectives. They are used to support a wide range of activities.

  • marine archaeology
  • research
  • ecosystem assessment surveys
  • site characterizations
  • oceanographic sampling
  • seafloor mapping
  • buoy maintenance
  • testing of emerging technologies
  • damage assessment and/or restoration
  • law enforcement
  • education and outreach
  • whale disentanglement

Small Research Vessel (SRV)
These regional boats, the SRVx and Manta, service the East Coast and Gulf of Mexico. They support sanctuaries ocean conservation and resource protection missions, especially in remote or high sea state areas. They fill the gap between missions suitable for smaller classes of sanctuary vessels and those performed using larger NOAA multipurpose coastal research ships.

East Coast and Gulf of Mexico
image of srvx SRVx: The Small Research Vessel Experimental (SRVx) is an 85 foot NOAA SRV class boat for operations along the East and Gulf coasts. It has a range of 1,700 nm and a cruising speed of 35 knots. It requires three to four crew (days versus overnight operations) and can accommodate 28 passengers for day trips and 12 passengers for overnight trips. It was built in 2005. The SRVx is used for research, education, diving, and enforcement activities. Its home port is located at Norfolk, VA.

Gulf of Mexico
image of Manta Manta: The Manta is an 83 foot NOAA SRV class boat that supports operations at Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. It has a range of 600 nm and a cruising speed of 27 knots. It requires four crew and can accommodate 10 passengers for up to five days (overnight). For single day missions, two to three crew are required and the vessel can accommodate up to 26 total passengers. The Manta supports research, education, and diving activities. It was built in 2007 and is home ported in Galveston, TX. Click here for more information.


Class III Boats

Northeast
Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary
image of auk Auk: The Auk is a 50 foot NOAA class III boat that supports a range of operations at Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary. It has a range of 400 nm and a cruising speed of 20 knots. It requires two crew and can accommodate 12 passengers for day trips and four to six passengers for overnight trips. It was built in 2006. Its primary uses are for research, education, diving, and enforcement. Its home port is located at Scituate, MA.

Southeast
Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary
image of joe ferguson Joe Ferguson: The Ferguson is a 41 foot NOAA class III boat that supports operations at Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary. It has a range of 350 nm and a cruising speed of 25 knots. It requires two crew and can accommodate 12 passengers for day trips and two to three passengers for overnight trips. It was built in 2008. It is used for research, diving, and buoy maintenance. Its home port is located in Savannah, GA.

West Coast
Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary
image of shearwater Shearwater: The Shearwater is a 62 foot NOAA class III boat that supports operations at Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary. It can work up to 180 days per year. It has a range of 400 nm and a cruising speed of 19 knots. It requires 2 to 3 crew and can accommodate up to 28 passengers for day trips and six passengers for up to five days overnight. It supports research, education, and diving activities. It includes a Bauer air compressor to support diving operations. It was built in 2002 and is home ported in Santa Barbara, CA.
2012 Accomplishments Report

image of fulmar Fulmar: The Fulmar is a 67 foot NOAA class III boat. It has a range of 400 nm and a cruising speed of 22 knots. The vessel was built in 2006 and home ported at the Monterey Harbor in Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. It also serves the Gulf of the Farallones and Cordell Bank national marine sanctuaries. It accommodates two to three crew, up to 27 passengers, and includes 10-12 berths. It was built in 2006 and is home ported in Monterey, CA.
2012 Accomplishments Report

image of 4107 R-4107: The 4107 is a 41 foot NOAA class III boat. It has a range of 300 nm and a cruising speed of 28 knots. The vessel was built in 2008 and home ported at the Monterey Harbor in Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. It has a day trip capacity for 10 and overnight capacity for four. It serves Monterey Bay, Gulf of the Farallones, and Cordell Bank national marine sanctuaries.


Class II Boats

Southeast
Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary
image of sam gray Sam Gray: The Sam Gray is a 36 foot NOAA class II boat that supports operations at Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary. It has a range of 250 nm and a cruising speed of 35 knots. It requires two crew and can accommodate six passengers for day trips. The boat can be trailered to alternative locations. It was built in 2004. The Gray suports research and diving activities. Its home port is located in Savannah, GA.

West Coast
Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary
image of tatoosh Tatoosh: The Tatoosh is a 38 foot NOAA class II boat. It has a range of 300 nm and is home ported in Port Angeles, WA, working out of La Push or Neah Bay, WA during the field season. It was built in 1994 and can operate up to 120 days per year. It supports research activities in Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary.

Pacific Islands
Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary
image of kohola Koholā: The Koholā is a 38 foot NOAA class II boat. It has a range of 200 nm and a maximum speed of 25 knots. It was built in 2011 and accommodates one to two crew and nine to 10 passengers. The vessel was specifically built and customized for large whale response, disentanglement and research. Based in the heart of the sanctuary, the vessel's homeport will be primarily in Maui at Mā'alaea Harbor.
Description

Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument
image of hihimanu Hīhīmanu: The Hīhīmanu is a 36 foot NOAA class II boat. It has a range of 200 nm and a maximum speed of 25 knots. It was built in 2007 and is home ported at NOAA Inouye Regional Center at Ford Island in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. It accommodates one to two crew and 9 to 10 passengers. This research vessel is the primary technical dive platform for tri-mix and rebreather training and proficiency dives. It is also used for education, outreach and research operations.

National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa
image of manuma Manuma: The Manuma is a 33 foot NOAA class II boat. It has a range of 205 nm and a maximum speed of 40 knots. It was built in 2007 and is home ported in Pago Pago, American Samoa. It accommodates one to two crew and 4 to 5 passengers.


Specialty Vessels

Northeast
Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary
image of storm Storm: The 50 foot RV Storm is operated by NOAA's Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab (GLERL) and is dedicated to supporting Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary. RV Storm was completely refitted in 2009-10. Special emphasis was placed on versatility to best support the sanctuary's diverse interests and projects The Storm operates about 70 days a year in the sanctuary.

Southeast
Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary
image of Peter Gladding Peter Gladding: The Gladding is a 57 foot NOAA class III boat that supports enforcement operations at Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. It has a range of 500 nm and a cruising speed of 36 knots. It requires three to four law enforcement officers crewing the boat. It was built in 2006 and is home ported in Key West, FL.


Contact Us
Please contact one of the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries staff listed below if you would like to learn more about the Small Boat Program or have an interest in a potential partnership activity.

Northeast

Auk - Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary
Contact: Ben.Haskell@noaa.gov

Storm - Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary/Great Lakes
Contact: Russ.Green@noaa.gov

SRVx - Northeast/Southeast
Contact: Joseph.Hoyt@noaa.gov

Southeast

Joe Ferguson/Sam Gray - Grays Reef National Marine Sanctuary
Contact: George.Sedberry@noaa.gov

Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary
Contact: Sean.Morton@noaa.gov

Manta - Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary
Contact: George.Schmahl@noaa.gov

West Coast

Shearwater - Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary
Contact: Chris.Mobley@noaa.gov

Fulmar & R4107 - West Coast
Contact: Dave.Lott@noaa.gov

Tatoosh - Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary
Contact: Kevin.Grant@noaa.gov

Pacific Islands

Kohola - Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary
Contact: Paul.B.Wong@noaa.gov

Hīhīmanu - Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument
Contact: Jason.Leonard@noaa.gov

Manuma - National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa
Contact: Gene.Brighouse@noaa.gov

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Revised October 18, 2013 by Sanctuaries Web Team | Contact Us | Web Site Owner: National Ocean Service
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