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Grays Reef - Living Sanctuary

Grays Reef - Habitats

Grays Reef - People and the Sanctuary

Grays Reef - Sustainable Seas

Grays Reef - Kids Gallery

 

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People and the Sanctuary

The R/V Jane Yarn is a 65 foot converted Navy vessel that has been renovated for marine science and education at Gray's Reef click image for more... (photo: Laddie Akins)

A year-round temperate climate, relative shallow water, accesible location, and the aesthetics of the area, make Gray's Reef an excellent location for sport diving. (photo: Grays Reef NMS)

In 1995 Gray's Reef initiated a long term monitoring assessment of its natural resources. The monitoring program encompasses the following resources and topics of concern determined to be of significant importance to GRNMS during the planning of the click image for more... (photo: Karen Angle)

The Gray's Reef Sea Turtle Satellite Tagging Project utilizes satellite transmitter tags to monitor adult and juvenile loggerhead sea click image for more... (photo: Karen Angle)

To capture a loggerhead underwater, the turtle is directed by divers into a hand held net, carried to the surface, and lifted onto a boat. Turtles are returned to the capture site following a blood sample and the attachment of a satellite transmitter. (photo: Karen Angle)

By learning more about the daily and seasonal movements, genetic information, and sexual maturity of loggerheads, researchers can better protect this prehistoric species. Here scientists at Gray's Reef are taking an ultrasound of a loggerhead click image for more... (photo: Karen Angle)

Over the years, researchers have learned much about loggerhead's nesting behavior (i.e. seasonality, number of eggs, sites), but click image for more... (photo: Grays Reef NMS)

Turtle Exclusion Devices (TEDS) are used by shrimpers to protect sea turtles from getting trapped in nets and drown. (photo: Karen Angle)

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